Stomach

The stomach appears as a fusiform dilation of the foregut in the 4th week of development. The dorsal border grows faster than the ventral border, thus producing the greater curvature. The stomach rotates along the longitudinal and antero-posterior axis. The rotation of the stomach along the longitudinal axis causes its left side to face anteriorly, and its right side posteriorly. The stomach is attached to the dorsal and ventral body wall by the dorsal and ventral mesogatrium. During rotation, the dorsal mesogastrium is pulled to the left, forming the omental bursa.


Stomach and dorsal mesentery



1. Liver
2. Stomach
3. Spleen
4. Pancreas
5. Adrenal gland
6. Aorta
7. Dorsal mesogastrium
8. Omental bursa
9. Falciform ligament
10. Lesser omentum

 



The dorsal mesogastrium extends tremendously as a double-layered flap of the mesentery, the greater omentum, which lies over the intestine. As the spleen forms in the dorsal mesogastrium, the lienorenal and gastrolienal ligaments develop as remnants or dorsal mesogastrium. The ventral mesogastrium attaches the lower esophagus, stomach and proximal duodenum to the ventral body wall. Growth of the liver causes the formation of the lesser omentum and falciform ligament in the ventral mesogastrium.


Stomach and dorsal mesentery

 

1. Liver
2. Stomach
3. Spleen
4. Pancreas
5. Adrenal gland
6. Aorta
7. Lesser omentum
8. Lienorenal ligament
9. Gastrolienal ligament
10. Falciform ligament
11. Parietal peritoneum